My Breastmilk Is Not Enough

 

I noticed the stress all over her. She really looked damn tired but still tried to maintain her calm.

She was tired and very worn out from staying awake all night and also had little rest the previous day. The baby wouldn’t stop crying.

And in the serenity of the night, in that tranquil environment even as everyone was quiet and the entire estate was deeply asleep, one could still hear her shrill voice as it pierced through that dark, cool night.

His mother was awake, still ‘half dazed and confused. She wasn’t able to articulate well as she was half asleep and half awake.

Her breasts couldn’t produce any milk. She cried almost throughout the day, silently as she waved the little baby throwing up those tiny hands and kicking into the air with those tiny legs.

No tears but the voice depicted deep longing for something that the mom seemed unable to give, she carried him and the crying stops, she drops him and the crying begins again. Mothers are pained at lactation failure. Lactation failure is not what any mother wants but unfortunately, it happens.

 

Even the famous singer ADELE experienced it too. You remember the famous song “HELLO”? That’s the singer. You can read about her and breastfeeding here. So if you are experiencing lactation failure, do not over stress yourself or get overly anxious.

 

Let’s look at the causes and what you can do to remedy the issue.

 

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Possible causes of low milk production

Various factors can cause a low milk supply during breast-feeding, such as waiting too long to start breast-feeding, not breast-feeding often enough, supplementing breastfeeding, an ineffective latch and use of certain medications Factors such as premature birth, maternal obesity, pregnancy-induced high blood pressure and poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes can also affect milk production.

 

Below I have outlined some practical tips you can use to ensure that you minimize this problem and breastfeed adequately as you like.

 

How To boost milk production:

 

Breast-feed often. For the first few weeks, breast-feed eight to 12 times a day — about every two to three hours. Breast-feeding less often can contribute to a low milk supply.

 

Check your latch. Make sure your baby is latched on and positioned well. Look for signs that your baby is swallowing.

 

Hold off on the pacifier. If you choose to give your baby a pacifier, consider waiting until three or four weeks after birth. This will give you time to settle into a regular nursing routine and establish your milk supply.

 

Breast-feed as soon as possible. Waiting too long to start breast-feeding can contribute to a low milk supply. Hold your baby skin to skin right after birth and your baby will likely breast-feed within the first hour after delivery.

Be alert to feeding problems. It’s OK for your baby to nurse on only one breast at a feeding occasionally — but if this happens regularly, your milk supply will decrease.

Offer both breasts at each feeding. You might need to pump the other breast to relieve pressure and protect your milk supply until your baby begins taking more at each feeding.

Don’t skip breast-feeding sessions. Pump your breasts each time you miss a breast-feeding session to help protect your milk supply.

Use medications with caution. Certain medications decrease milk supply, including medications containing pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Zyrtec D, others).

Your health care provider might also caution against certain types of hormonal contraception, at least until breast-feeding is firmly established.

 

Avoid alcohol and nicotine. Drinking moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol can decrease milk production. Smoking can have the same effect.

Let me know what you think about this article and also what the problems are so we can talk.

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